CAP 722 H First edition 5 December 2022

Specific Category Operations – Pre-defined Risk Assessment Requirements, Guidance & Policy

Safety and Airspace Regulation Group


Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Specific Category Operations-

Pre-defined Risk Assessment Requirements, Guidance & Policy

CAP 722H


Published by the Civil Aviation Authority, 2022


Civil Aviation Authority Aviation House Beehive Ring Road Crawley

West Sussex RH6 0YR


All rights reserved. Copies of this publication may be reproduced for personal use, or for use within a company or organisation, but may not otherwise be reproduced for publication.


To use or reference CAA publications for any other purpose, for example within training material for students, please contact the CAA at the address above for formal agreement.


First edition of CAP 722H, 5 December 2022


The latest version of this document is available in electronic format at www.caa.co.uk/CAP722H


Contents


Contents Error! Bookmark not defined.

Chapter 1 | General introduction 6

Chapter 2 | Pre-Defined Risk Assessments 8

Chapter 3 | Supporting Information 11

Revision history

First edition December 2022

This is the first edition of this document. Content has been removed from CAP 722, and updated, for inclusion within this stand-alone document.


Foreword


Purpose


The purpose of this document is to describe the concept of a pre-defined risk assessment, and to set out each PDRA available in the UK to UAS Operators for use in the Specific category only. This subject was originally covered in CAP 722 Annex B, and has now been moved to this document.

This document lays out the conditions and limitations for any PDRA developed and published by the CAA.


Scope


This document applies only to Specific Category Operations.

Note 1:

PDRAs published by JARUS, EASA or any other body are currently not recognised within the UK.

Note 2:

Further PDRAs are under development and will be published in future revisions of CAP 722H.


Availability


The latest version of CAP 722H can be located within the publications section of the CAA website.

Updated information can be found within the latest updates section of the CAA website’s UAS webpages.

The CAA also provides a more general aviation update service via the SkyWise system, which can be filtered by subject matter for relevant UAS related information.


Structure


Chapter 1 describes the policy and general requirements that relate to PDRAs;

Chapter 2 describes individual PDRAs, published by the CAA;

Chapter 3 provides supporting information to the PDRAs described in Chapter 2.

CAP 722H, sits within the CAP 722 suite of UAS guidance and policy, which can be found


here .


Editorial                     practices                     


In this document the following editorial practices apply:

  • Must/ must not’ indicates a mandatory requirement.

  • Should’ indicates a strong obligation (in other words, a person would need to provide clear justification for not complying with the obligation).

  • May’ indicates discretion.

  • ‘Describe’ / ‘explain’ indicates the provision of logical argument and any available evidence that justifies a situation, choice, or action.


Requirements are set out within blue boxes within each chapter.

Regulatory references, which support the requirement listed above, are included below in italics.

Point of contact


Unless otherwise stated, all enquiries relating to CAP 722H must be made to: GA and RPAS Unit

CAA

Safety and Airspace Regulation Group Aviation House

Beehive Ring Road Crawley

West Sussex RH6 0YR


E-mail: uavenquiries@caa.co.uk


Abbreviations and glossary of term


The definitive list of abbreviations and terms/definitions that are relevant to UAS operations within the UK and for the whole CAP 722 ‘series’ of documents are centralised within CAP 722D UAS Definitions and Glossary ( www.caa.co.uk/cap722d )


Chapter 1| GENERAL INTRODUCTION


    1. Regulatory Requirements


      The risk associated with any UAS operation carried out within the specific category

      must be evaluated by the CAA, by means of a suitable risk assessment.

      UAS IR Article 12(1)


      The CAA must be satisfied that the level of risk has been mitigated to an acceptable level, before an Operational Authorisation may be issued.

      UAS IR Article 12(2)


      PDRAs are used to satisfy the regulatory requirement above and facilitate certain, repeatable low risk, operations in the Specific category. This reduces the volume of evidence required, and administrative burden to both the operator and the CAA.

      It is the UAS Operator’s responsibility to ensure safe conduct of every flight. This includes flights conducted under a PDRA. Operators still own and manage the associated risk and must carry out any dynamic risk assessment required, as per their operational procedures within Volume 1 of their operations manual. It is the operator’s responsibility to ensure that all risks identified are tolerable and ALARP prior to conducting any operations under a PDRA.

      The CAA will carry out the static risk assessment for operations covered under a PDRA. It will then publish the operation and its associated mitigations as a set of conditions and limitations.

      CAA risk assessments are based on the heat map methodology described within CAP 722A. This is the current acceptable method to ensure compliance with UAS IR Article 11: Rules for conducting an operational risk assessment. This methodology is used to assess the overall risk picture of the type of operation being performed.

      The operator is responsible for managing and mitigating any additional risks that are identified as part of the operation.

      This process then creates a set of standard operating conditions and limitations as well any technical requirements that will become part of the operational authorisation. The operation must be conducted within the conditions and limitations of the authorisation at all times.

      Following a successful application, this will result in a standardised operational authorisation being issued by the CAA to the operator. No deviation or variation is possible to the conditions or limitations of a PDRA. Operations outside these limitations will require


      a separate application to the CAA, following the requirements and guidance set out in CAP 722A.

      Regulatory requirements set out within the Regulation (EU) 2019/947 as retained (and amended in UK domestic law) under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, or within any other applicable regulation, must also be complied with, in addition to those conditions and limitations set out within the Operational Authorisation that relate specifically to a PDRA.


    2. Application


      Application for a PDRA authorisation must be made through the Specific Category application form, here.

      Refer to CAP 722 Chapter 2 for guidance

      The documentation that is required is set out within individual PDRAs.

      Applications made for a PDRA Operational Authorisation are subject to a separate fee as set out in the CAA Scheme of Charges.


    3. Management of Changes to PDRAs


The CAA may make updates to the requirements, conditions and limitations of a PDRA at any time, by updating CAP 722H. When a PDRA is updated, any operator who holds a current operational authorisation based on an old PDRA may continue to operate to the conditions and limits within the operational authorisation. This will be updated to reflect the new PDRA upon renewal.

If the CAA issue any Safety Notice or Directive, it is the operator’s responsibility to implement any changes necessary to their operation, procedures or aircraft prior to recommencing operations.

Note:

Operators are responsible for the safe conduct of any flight. It is the applicant’s responsibility to monitor CAP 722H via the CAA website for any changes that may impact the conditions and limitations of their authorisation and to make any changes to their operations as required for renewal of their authorisation.


Chapter 2 | PRE-DEFINED RISK ASSESSMENTS


This chapter sets out each PDRA produced by the CAA in the following pages. Where necessary, supporting information can be found in Chapter 3 for individual PDRAs.


Chapter 2 Contents


PDRA Number

Description

UKPDRA01

VLOS Operations within 150 metres of any Residential, Commercial, Industrial or Recreational Areas for UAS with a Maximum Take-Off Mass of less than 25kg

Table 1- Summary of PDRAs


    1. UKPDRA01


      PRE-DEFINED RISK ASSESSMENT – UKPDRA01

      VLOS Operations within 150 metres of any Residential, Commercial, Industrial or Recreational Areas for UAS with a Maximum Take-Off Mass of less than 25kg


      Summary

      This PDRA is designed to enable VLOS operations with UAS in the areas that are likely to be more ‘congested’ than the areas where subcategory A3 operations are permitted.

      Operational Conditions and Limitations

      UKPDRA01 is subject to the following operational conditions:

      • VLOS only, as defied in UK Regulation (EU) 2019/947 Article 2(7), and GM1 Article 2(7), within the Acceptable Means of Compliance and Guidance Material to this regulation. The use of a UA observer situated next to the remote pilot, is permitted.

      • Maximum height not to exceed 400 feet above the surface. Structures/obstacles taller than 105m may be overflown by a maximum of 15m providing the UA remains within 50m of the structure or obstacle.

      • Flight permitted within 150 metres of any Residential, Commercial, Industrial or Recreational Area for UAS.

      • Flight may take place during the hours of daylight or at night.

      • No flight within 50 metres of any uninvolved person, except that during take-off and landing this distance may be reduced to 30 metres. Any overflight of uninvolved people must be kept to a minimum.

      • No flights within restricted airspace (Restricted Areas, Danger Areas, FRZs) without relevant permission for access to that airspace.

      • Any overflight of assemblies of people is prohibited.

      • Flight within 50 metres horizontally of assemblies of people is prohibited.

        • The height of the UA must not exceed the horizontal distance from any assembly of people. (i.e. the 1:1 ‘rule’).

      • Remote pilots operating alone must enable a technical means (e.g. containment system such as geo awareness) to prevent their aircraft exiting the operational volume.

      • No dropping of Articles

      • No carriage of dangerous goods


        Technical Limitations

      • UAS mass of less than 25kg (fixed wing or rotary wing).

      • UAS equipped with a mechanism that makes it land in the event of loss or disruption of C2 Link.

      • Suitable lighting to assist with visual conspicuity, maintain situational awareness, and orientation of the UA.


Additional Requirements

  • UAS Operators must produce an operations manual which details organisational information, how flights are performed and associated safety procedures’ (i.e. how maintenance activities are performed). CAP 722A contains further details (only the preliminary information/Ops manual Volume 1 element of the operations manual, including technical details as set out in Chapter 3 is required for this PDRA).

  • Complete and submit the table in Section 3.1 with the application.

  • All remote pilots involved in the operation must be in possession of a valid General VLOS Certificate (GVC).

    • Unless renewing an existing PDRA01 Operational authorisation, in which case an NQE Recommendation will be accepted until 01st January 2024.

  • All remote pilots involved in the operation must have had a minimum of 2 hours logged flying time in the previous 3 months on unmanned aircraft of a similar type.

  • Insurance cover to meet insurance regulatory requirements (EU 785/2004)

  • Report occurrences in accordance with (EU 376/2014).

  • Report accidents in accordance with (EU 996/2010) to the UK AAIB.


    DOCUMENTS TO BE INCLUDED IN THE APPLICATION

  • Operations Manual.

  • Copy of competency certificates for all remote pilots intending to fly under the authorisation.

  • Copy of any supporting UAS Operator Flight Records. Generally, only for renewal applications.


Chapter 3 | SUPPORTING INFORMATION


    1. PDRA01- Technical Characteristics of the System


      Although PDRA01 only requires volume 1 of the Operations manual to be produced and submitted, any applicant for a Specific category authorisation must include certain technical information on the UAS, within their application. This form has been produced to meet this requirement, without the need for a full volume 2 to be produced. This can be incorporated as an Annex within Volume 1

      UAS IR Article 11(2)(d)


      Explain in detail the performance and technical characteristics (design flight envelope) of the unmanned aircraft. If applicants use more than one type of UAS for this PDRA, then this process must be completed for all platform types to be used.

      Guidance Note: This information could be extracted from the data sheet supplied by the manufacturer of the UAS to complete this requirement. Only fill in what is relevant and provided.

      The following information must be included:


      Mass

      Empty Mass

      (Unit to be used Kg)

      Maximum Take-Off Mass (MTOM)

      (This includes payloads and fuel)

      Dimensions for Fixed-Wing

      Wingspan


      Fuselage Length


      Fuselage Diameter


      Dimensions for Rotorcraft / Multirotor

      Length of aircraft body


      Width of aircraft body


      Height of aircraft body


      Propeller Dimensions


      Propeller Configuration


      Centre of Gravity (CG)

      (if applicable)


      Flight Duration / Endurance


      Maximum Range


      Maximum Operating Height (Service Ceiling)


      Maximum Airspeed



      Environmental / Weather Limitations


      Any other relevant information



      Fuel Type


      Status Indicators / Alert Messages


      Hazardous Substances

      (if applicable)

      Any other relevant information



      Batteries

      Quantity


      Type


      Arrangement


      Electrical Loads


      Any other relevant information



      Engines

      Type


      Quantity


      Propeller Type


      Any other relevant information



      Sensors (These are sensors that assist in the safe flight of the UA, and not the payload)

      Type


      Quantity


      Backup Means of Navigation and Guidance

      (if fitted)

      Automatic Flight Control Functions

      (If fitted)

      Geo-awareness Functions

      (If fitted)

      Any other relevant information



      C2 Link

      Range


      Transceivers / Modems

      Power Levels


      Operating Frequencies Used


      Third Party Link Service Provider

      (If applicable)

      Data Rates


      Latencies


      Any other relevant information



    2. PDRA01 Risk Assessment

Hazard 1: RPAS technical malfunction leading to a Loss of Control in flight



Hazard Type


Hazard Specifics/ Descriptors


Safety Risk

Mitigations (as exist in law for Open

Category)


Likelihood


Severity


Initial Risk Level


Safety Status

Mitigations as applied following GVC

training


Likelihood


Severity


Final Risk Level


Safety Status





M1






M12 M13 M14 M15 M20 M22 M24 M25 M26 M28 M29







Mid Air Collision

M5

M6

M7


2


4


8


Review


1


4


4


Acceptable




M10












M11










Chassis / Fixings












failure











Airframe failure

(Aircraft

structural failure























resulting in

descent)







M12 M13













M14







Collision

M1





M15







with

Uninvolved

M5

M8

3

3

9

Review

M17

M20

2

3

6

Acceptable



Person

M9





M22








M11





M24













M25













M28













M29















M12













M13








M1





M14







Mid Air Collision

M5

M6 M7


4


4


16


Unacceptable

M18

M19 M20


2


4


8


Review




M10





M22








M11





M26













M27













M29







Unsafe/Outdated








M12 M13 M14 M19 M20 M22 M25 M26 M27 M29






Firmware state













Collision

M1









Avionics Failure

GNSS

degradation

with

Uninvolved

M5

M8

3

3

9

Review

2

3

6

Acceptable



person

M11










Component












failure




















M12













M13







Collision with Assembly of people

M1

M5 M8 M9 M11


2


4


8


Review

M14

M19 M20 M22 M23


2


4


8


Review









M26













M27













M29















M12













M13













M14








Mid Air Collision

M1 M5 M7 M10 M11


3


4


12


Review

M15

M18 M19 M20 M22 M24


2


4


8


Review









M26






Motor failure







M27













M28













M29






Propeller Failure














M1 M5 M8 M9 M11










Propulsion Failure













Battery Failure






M12

M13












M14






ESC Failure






M15

M17







Collision





M19







with

Uninvolved

3

3

12

Review

M20

M21

2

3

6

Acceptable



Person





M22












M24












M25












M26












M27












M28












M29















M12













M14








M1





M18







Mid Air Collision

M5

M7 M11


2


4


8


Review

M20

M22 M24


1


4


4


Acceptable




M10





M26






Component







M27





GCS Failure

failure







M29
















(handset/computer)














Power Failure







M12

M14







Collision

M1





M20







with

Uninvolved

M5

M8

2

3

6

Acceptable

M22

M24

1

3

3

Acceptable



Person

M9





M25








M11





M26













M27













M29





Hazard 2: Degradation of Pilot/Flight Crew performance leading to a Loss of Control in flight



Hazard Type


Hazard Specifics/ Descriptors


Safety Risk

Mitigations (as exist in law for Open

Category)


Likelihood


Severity


Initial Risk Level


Safety Status

Mitigations as applied following GVC

training


Likelihood


Severity


Final Risk Level


Safety Status









M12













M18













M20








M2





M22







Mid Air

Collision

M6

M7

2

4

8

Review

M26

M30

2

4

8

Review




M10





M31








M53





M32













M33













M34













M12













M20






Pilot incapacitation

Fatigue,

ill-health, intoxication

Collision with Uninvolved Person


M2 M8 M53


3


3


9


Review

M22 M26 M30 M31 M32


2


3


6


Acceptable









M33













M34













M12













M20













M22







Collision

M2





M23







with

Assembly

M8

M9

2

4

8

Review

M26

M30

2

4

8

Review



of people

M53





M31













M32













M33













M34














M12













M20








M2





M22







Mid Air

Collision

M6

M7

3

4

12

Review

M31

M32

2

4

8

Review




M10





M34






Distractions


M53





M36

M37













M12






Workplace







M20






stress







M22






Loss of Situational Awareness


Mental Capacity Overload

Collision

with Uninvolved Person

M2 M8 M53


3


3


9


Review

M31

M32 M34 M36 M37


2


3


6


Acceptable









M43






Poor







M50






Communications







M12













M20






Poor Visual Perception


Collision with Assembly of people


M2 M8 M9 M53


2


4


8


Review

M22

M23 M31 M32 M34 M36


2


4


8


Review









M37













M43













M50





Hazard 3: Operational Volume Conditions leading to a Loss of Control in Flight



Hazard Type


Hazard Specifics/ Descriptors


Safety Risk

Mitigations (as exist in law for Open

Category)


Likelihood


Severity


Initial Risk Level


Safety Status

Mitigations as applied following GVC

training


Likelihood


Severity


Final Risk Level


Safety Status









M12













M20








M3





M22








M4





M26







Mid Air

Collision

M5

M6

3

4

12

Review

M34

M35

2

4

8

Review




M7





M39






Meteorological

Conditions


M10





M40 M41






affecting the

Pilot







M44

















Weather














Meteorological

Conditions affecting the RPAS


Collision with Uninvolved Person


M3 M4 M5 M8


4


3


12


Review

M12 M20 M22 M26 M34 M35 M39


2


3


6


Acceptable









M40













M41













M44










M3






M12 M20 M22 M34 M40 M42 M43








M4











Mid Air

Collision

M5

M6

1

4

4

Acceptable

1

4

4

Acceptable




M7












M10










Man Made











Ground based

objects











Objects
























Natural Objects




















M12







Collision with Uninvolved Person

M3 M4 M5 M8


4


3


12


Review

M20

M22 M34 M40 M42


2


3


6


Acceptable









M43










M3






M12 M22 M26 M34 M40 M44 M45








M4











Mid Air

Collision

M5

M6

3

4

12

Review

2

4

8

Review




M7












M10


















M12













M20






C2 link

Collision

M3





M22






Signal degradation

degradation

with Uninvolved

Person

M4 M5

M8

3

3

9

Review

M26 M34

M40

2

3

6

Acceptable


GNSS







M44






Degradation







M45














M12













M20







Collision with Assembly of people

M3 M4 M5 M8


2


4


8


Review

M22

M23 M26 M34 M40


2


4


8


Review









M44













M45





Hazard 4: Airspace Incursion (Incursion into the operating airspace) leading to a Mid Air Collision



Hazard Type


Hazard Specifics/ Descriptors


Safety Risk

Mitigations (as exist in law for Open

Category)


Likelihood


Severity


Initial Risk Level


Safety Status

Mitigations as applied following GVC

training


Likelihood


Severity


Final Risk Level


Safety Status


Other Air Users


(General Aviation, Helicopter, emergency, Commercial AT, Business Jet) within flight volume


Mid Air Collision


M3 M4 M5 M6 M7 M10 M54


3


5


15


Unacceptable


M12 M14 M20 M22 M38 M46 M47 M48 M49 M55


2


5


10


Review

Hazard 5: Ground Incursion (3rd Party Ingress) leading to a Loss of Control



Hazard Type


Hazard Specifics/ Descriptors


Safety Risk

Mitigations (as exist in law for Open

Category)


Likelihood


Severity


Initial Risk Level


Safety Status

Mitigations as applied following GVC

training


Likelihood


Severity


Final Risk Level


Safety Status


Uninvolved people ingress to TOAL area



Collision with Uninvolved 3rd Parties


M3 M4 M5 M8


4


3


12


Review


M12 M14 M16 M20 M22 M25 M50 M51 M52 M55


2


3


6


Acceptable


Uninvolved people ingress beneath flightpath



Collision with Uninvolved Person


M3 M4 M5 M8


4


3


12


Review


M12 M14 M16 M20 M22 M25 M50 M51 M52 M55


2


3


6


Acceptable

Mitigation Identifier

Mitigation Description

M1

Pilot Competence attested by Flyer ID (test covers UAS General Knowledge)

M2

Pilot Competence attested by Flyer ID (test covers human performance limitations)

M3

Pilot Competence attested by Flyer ID (test has subjects; air safety, airspace restrictions and aviation regulation, operating procedures)

M4

The remote pilot must have the ability to maintain control of the unmanned aircraft, except in the case of a lost link or when operating a free-flight unmanned aircraft

M5

Flights must only be performed by a remote pilot who has read the instruction manual provided by the manufacturer of the UAS

M6

The remote pilot must keep the unmanned aircraft in VLOS and maintain a thorough visual scan of the airspace surrounding the unmanned aircraft in order to avoid any risk of collision with any manned aircraft. The remote pilot shall discontinue the flight if the operation poses a risk to other aircraft, people, animals, environment or property.

M7

The unmanned aircraft shall be maintained within 120 metres from the closest point of the surface of the earth.

M8

Remote pilot must not permit overflight of assemblies of people and must reasonably expect no uninvolved person will be overflown. In the event of unexpected overflight of uninvolved persons, the remote pilot shall reduce as much as possible the time during which the unmanned aircraft overflies those persons.

M9

A minimum horizontal distance from assemblies of people shall be no less than the height

M10

The remote pilot must comply with the operational limitations in geographical zones designated in accordance with Article 15; (FRZs)

M11

Remote Pilot Responsibilities (OPEN.050 & SPEC.050) – ensure that the UAS is in a condition to safely complete the intended flight and, if applicable, check the direct remote identification is active and up to date

M12

Remote pilot competence re GVC Course subjects 'Air Law/ Responsibilities, UAS Airspace Operating Principles, Human performance Limitations, Meteorology, Navigation/ Charts, Airmanship and Aviation Safety, UAS General Knowledge & Operating Procedures ' (Areas to be covered detailed in CAP722B)

M13

GVC Course re 'Operator Responsibilities' – UAS Operator Maintenance regime – Maintenance procedures (Manufacturer recommended maintenance, user maintenance checklist, Maintenance frequency), safe handling/transportation/storage, Monitoring firmware releases from manufacturer

M14

GVC Course re Practical Flying test – UAS Operator flight procedures re normal procedures (Multirotor & Fixed Wing) for flight volume defined by 500m radius horizontal and 400ft above surface

M15

GVC Course re Practical Flying test – UAS Operator Pre & Post flight checks – Visual inspection of aircraft structure and security (use of checklists),

M16

UAS Operator On-site Procedures for Site survey, Selection of main and alternate operating sites and cordon procedure with 3rd party management,

M17

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency procedures – Fire.

M18

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency procedures – Flyaway

M19

UAS Operator Logs and records – maintenance activities conducted on UA

M20

(SPEC.060) comply with the operator’s procedures

M21

UAS Operator on-site procedures for refuelling including charging and changing

M22

(UAS.SPEC.050) establish procedures and limitations adapted to the type of the intended operation and the risk involved

M23

When operating near assemblies of uninvolved people the Unmanned Aircraft must have an appropriately set maximum allowed distance from launch/pilot. When operating as a lone Remote Pilot (no observer / payload operator) and near assemblies of uninvolved people the aircraft must have an appropriately set geo-fence. Any auto-RTH function must not permit return flight over or within 50m of an Assembly of uninvolved people

M24

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Remain within manufacturer recommended performance envelope of UAS,

M25

UAS Operator Flight Procedures for normal procedure, during take-off and landing e.g. 30m min separation from 3rd parties and In flight e.g. 50m separation from 3rd parties with limited overflight

M26

The Unmanned Aircraft must be equipped with a mechanism that will cause it to land in the event of a disruption to, or a failure of, any of its control systems

M27

Functionality checks prior to flight (Pilot assessment of controller responses and software functionality before flight), take-off procedures including RTH test flight performed before operation commences.

M28

UAS Operator Pre & Post flight checks – Visual inspection of aircraft structure and security (use of checklists), secure Battery Installation and ensure battery level is sufficient for flight.

M29

UAS Operator Maintenance regime – Maintenance procedures (Manufacturer recommended maintenance, user maintenance checklist, Maintenance frequency), safe handling/transportation/storage, Monitoring firmware releases from manufacturer

M30

Remote Pilot capability to self-assess, self-appraisal of health and ability to perform safely, other personnel training re expected performance of Pilot, Weather awareness and appropriate PPE choice.

M31

UAS Operator crew health policy on working periods/ duty hours, Resistance to client/peer/company pressure to perform, alcohol/drug use

M32

UAS Operator policy re alcohol/drug use, Peer appraisal of Pilot state before flight

M33

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency procedures – Pilot incapacitation (RTH).

M34

UAS Operator flight procedures re normal procedures (Multirotor & Fixed Wing) for flight volume defined by 500m radius horizontal and 400ft above surface, (correct set up of flight termination system – note difference between single and multiple crewed operations

M35

Operating Procedures' (ability to use flight telemetry distance indicator and appropriate site survey to gauge distances to visible objects in operating volume) capability to self-assess, self-appraisal of health and ability to perform safely, Other personnel training re expected performance of Pilot, Weather awareness and appropriate PPE choice.

M36

UAS Operator On-site Procedures – crew briefing re site awareness and self-positioning (use of maps/GPS), location relative to launch location (for situations in which the pilot or observer are mobile), use of possible cordon control measures

M37

UAS Operator Pre-flight checks – correct set up of flight termination system

M38

Remote Pilot Competence (ability to use flight telemetry distance indicator and appropriate site survey to gauge distances to visible objects in operating volume) weather system monitoring, ability to detect aircraft path deviation due to wind conditions, understanding of aircraft design flight envelope,

M39

UAS Operator Procedures for pre-flight checks, obtaining weather forecast, local weather conditions and applicable UAS operating limitations (wind and water ingress resistance, UAS design flight envelope) prior to flight

M40

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency procedures – abnormal environmental conditions and C2 Link Loss

M41

Remote pilot resistant to client/peer/company pressure to perform in inappropriate meteorological conditions

M42

Operating Procedures', (flight handling capability around ground-based objects with knowledge of vortexing around structures/terrain and in-flight awareness of UAS position in operational volume, ability to use flight telemetry distance indicator and appropriate site survey to gauge distances to visible objects in operating volume), understanding of aircraft design flight envelope and maintenance of suitable safe boundaries around object

M43

UAS Operator On-site Procedures for Site survey identifying hazards (proximity to 3rd parties/ roads/ animals/ traffic/ aeronautical activities/ danger areas) and conducting additional risk assessments (appropriate choice of Pilot and crew operating base location to avoid slips/trips/falls

M44

Operating Procedures', antenna directionality and effective range, GNSS signal susceptibility to ferrous structures, reflectance and shadowing. Awareness of solar weather state, understanding of aircraft design flight envelope and maintenance of suitable safe boundaries around object,

M45

UAS Operator Procedures for determining the intended task feasibility and site assessment, for efficient use of radio spectrum, awareness of OFCOM nationally allowed power outputs and avoidance of harmful interference e.g. proximity to HIRTA's, Ensure sufficient satellites in range before commence flight.

M46

UAS Operator Procedures for determining the intended task feasibility Site assessment for airspace classification and airspace restrictions,

M47

UAS Operator procedures for pre-notification to third parties (e.g. FRZ permission and NOTAM) and any local aviation stakeholders,

M48

UAS Operator procedures for in-flight comm's with involved aircraft,

M49

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency Procedures – Airspace Incursion

M50

Operating Procedures'(ability to use flight telemetry distance indicator and appropriate site survey to gauge distances to visible objects in operating volume) planned flight path adjustment to accommodate unexpected movement of 3rd parties (including 3rd party aggression) and avoid breech of 50m proximity, prioritising safety of people over state of UAS, use of any additional information e.g. 1st person video feed and crew communications

M51

UAS Operator Procedures for determining the intended task feasibility, site permissions (landowners’ permission), site assessment for extraordinary restrictions e.g. habitation, recreational activities and public access

M52

UAS Operator Flight Procedures – Emergency Procedures – loss of separation distances to uninvolved third parties (emergency landing procedures)

M53

Remote Pilot must not perform duties under the influence of psychoactive substances or alcohol or when they are unfit to perform their tasks due to injury, fatigue, medication, sickness or other causes

M54

When flying an unmanned aircraft within a horizontal distance of 50 metres from an artificial obstacle taller than 105 metres, the maximum height of the UAS operation may be increased up to 15 metres above the height of the obstacle at the request of the entity responsible for the obstacle

M55

Pilot currency on similar aircraft type (2 hours in 3 months).